Events to Celebrate Women's History Month

February 21, 2012 – The Dutchess Community College annual celebration of Women’s History Month will be held in March with Lyceum speakers, an art exhibit, a reading of works by female authors and more. The theme for the month is “Women, Politics and Change.” Among the highlights will be a presentation by Salon.com senior writer Rebecca Traister about the prominent women in the 2008 presidential election and the subsequent media coverage.

The first Lyceum of the month will be held March 1 at 12:30 p.m. in the James and Betty Hall Theatre. “What Would Eleanor Do?” will be presented by Marist College Professor Dr. Joanne Myers. The talk will explore Eleanor Roosevelt’s journey into feminism and activism, illuminate how her advocacy of universal human rights might have evolved in today’s world of social media, and what citizens can do today to make a difference.

The second Lyceum will be presented by Salon.com senior writer Rebecca Traister. Titled “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” the lecture will focus on her coverage of Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin and Michelle Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign and the treatment of the slate of female candidates by the media at large.

An exhibit by local artist Monica d. Church will be on display all month in DCC’s Mildred I. Washington Art Gallery. Titled “From the Studio: 1995-2010,” it is a survey of work that includes handmade paper, mixed media, paintings, collage, sculpture and photography. An opening reception will take place March 7 at 5 p.m. In addition, a tour of the DCC Gallery will be given March 22 at 6 p.m. followed by a public talk by Church at 6:30 p.m. in Washington Hall, room 132.

The complete list of Women’s History Month events is below.

For more information about any of the events, contact Susan Conrad at (845) 431-8534 .

 

FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 30
MONICA d. CHURCH, ‘FROM THE STUDIO: 1995-2010’
MILDRED I. WASHINGTON ART GALLERY

“From the Studio: 1995-2010,” is a survey of work that includes hand-made paper, mixed media, paintings, collage, sculpture and photography. The pieces were selected from Church’s work during the past 15 years. She investigates themes including recycling, Avian Influenza, motherhood, loss and desire. Church is the associate director of the James W. Palmer ’90 Gallery at Vassar College and a former technical assistant and art instructor at both Vassar and DCC. An opening reception will take place March 7 at 5 p.m. In addition, a tour of the DCC Gallery will be given March 22 at 6 p.m. followed by a public talk by Church at 6:30 p.m. in Washington Hall, room 132.

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 12:30 p.m.
LYCEUM – DR. JOANNE MYERS, ‘WHAT WOULD ELEANOR DO?’
JAMES AND BETTY HALL THEATRE
Eleanor Roosevelt did not begin life as a feminist or an activist, but by the end of her life, she was considered by many to be the First Lady of the World. If she were alive today, she would be tweeting, blogging and most importantly, putting her words into action. This talk will weave her story and political techniques used in her fight for universal human rights into a model that any concerned citizen can use to make the world better.

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 12 - 1 p.m.
‘TWO WOMEN WRITERS OF THE HUDSON VALLEY’
HUDSON HALL, ROOM 503

The DCC Writing Center’s Featured Women Writers Dr. Jan Zlotnik Schmidt, professor of English at SUNY New Paltz, and Dr. Lucia Cherciu, a member of the DCC English Department, will read excerpts from their own published poetry and creative non-fiction. Schmidt will sign copies of her recent chapbook, “The Earth Was Still,” published by Finishing Line Press in 2011.

 

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 12:30 p.m.
LYCEUM – REBECCA TRAISTER, ‘BIG GIRLS DON’T CRY’
JAMES AND BETTY HALL THEATRE

Rebecca Traister, senior writer at Salon.com, has covered women in media, politics and entertainment since 2003. Traister covered the 2008 campaign from a feminist and personal perspective. She received a huge response to her pieces on Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin, Michelle Obama, the media’s coverage of the candidates and the role of women within the media. Her book, “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” is the result. It makes sense of this moment in American history, in which women broke barriers and changed the country’s narrative in completely unexpected ways. Books will be available for purchase, and a book-signing will be held after the presentation.

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 12:30 p.m.
READING WOMEN
DUTCHESS HALL, ROOM 101

Members of the DCC community will read works inspired by this year’s Women’s History Month theme of “Women, Politics, and Change.” Join Dr. Brenda Squires from DCC’s English & Humanities department as she hosts this annual tradition celebrating women and literature. Refreshments will be served. For additional information, contact Brenda Squires at (845) 431-8453 .

 

THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 5-7 p.m.
FILM: ‘NORMA RAE’
BOWNE HALL, ROOM 122

Directed by Martin Ritt and written by Harriet Frank Jr. and Irving Ravetch, “Norma Rae” is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton (1940–2009), from New York Times reporter Henry P. Leifermann’s 1975 book “Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance.” The story of empowerment and fairness focuses on a textile worker from a small town who becomes involved in labor union activities. Sally Field won the Academy Award for Best Actress for her portrayal of Norma Rae Webster. “Norma Rae” was included in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2011. The two-hour film will be followed by a discussion. Popcorn will be provided. Bring your own soft drink.

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 12:30 p.m.
LYCEUM: ‘REMEMBER THE LADIES: A HISTORY OF AMERICAN WOMEN IN SONG,” A LECTURE AND PERFORMANCE BY LINDA RUSSELL
BOWNE HALL, ROOM 122

Come by for a musical survey of the history of women in America. By looking at the popular songs of the past - the ballads, love songs, suffrage anthems, work songs and dance tunes – Linda Russell will trace the perceptions and realities of women’s lives in 18th- and 19th-century American society. Accompanying herself on mountain and hammered dulcimers, pennywhistle, guitar and limberjack, Russell explores the images in the songs, interspersing the music with lively commentary that includes excerpts from diaries and letters of women telling their stories in their own words. Russell has explored America’s past through song for 30 years, recording eight albums of traditional and historical music.

 

 

###