DCC Events to Mark Black History Month

January 14, 2014 – A gospel concert, Kwanzaa celebration and a program about songs from the Civil Rights movement are just a few of the activities Dutchess Community College is offering to celebrate Black History Month. Activities will be held at DCC’s Poughkeepsie campus. All are free and open to the public.

DCC’s celebration of Kwanzaa will serve as the Black History Month kickoff event. It will be held on Jan. 28 at 12:30 p.m. in Dutchess Hall, room 101. The college community will celebrate the seven principles of Kwanzaa:  Unity, Self Determination, Creative Work and Responsibility, Cooperative Economics, Purpose, Creativity and Faith.

A Lyceum presentation, “Songs From the Civil Rights Movement,” will be held Jan. 30 at
12:30 p.m. in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall. Victoria Christgau, the founder and executive director of the Connecticut Center for Nonviolence, will present an interactive program celebrating the songs of the Civil Rights Movement, which helped bring Martin Luther King Jr.’s words to life.

The annual gospel concert is scheduled for Feb. 9 at 3 p.m. in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall, and will feature praise dancers and youth and adult choirs from local churches. The show has drawn standing-room-only crowds for the past few years.

The Cultural Dance Expressions performance is another popular event, scheduled for Feb. 22,
4 to 6 p.m., in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall. The show will incorporate both classic and modern dance genres. Dance troupes, teams and individuals will perform African, Caribbean, Liturgical, Modern, Ballet, Tap, Hip Hop and other popular styles.

The full list of DCC Black History Month activities is below and on the events calendar here.

For more information, contact co-chairpersons of the DCC Black History Month Committee, Carmen McGill at (845) 431-8017 or Yvonne Flowers at (845) 431-8074.

 

Tuesday, January 28, 12:30-2 p.m.
Kwanzaa Celebration (Kick-Off event)
Dutchess Hall, Room 101
The college community celebrates the seven principles of Kwanzaa:  Unity, Self Determination, Creative Work and Responsibility, Cooperative Economics, Purpose, Creativity and Faith.

 

Thursday, January 30, 12:30 p.m.
Lyceum – “Songs From the Civil Rights Movement”  by Victoria Christgau
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall
Victoria Christgau, the Founder and Executive Director of the Connecticut Center for Nonviolence (CTCN), will bring an interactive program to campus that celebrates the songs of the Civil Rights Movement and brings MLK’s words to life. This powerful program works to keep the dream alive, making connections for students between the struggles of the past, the current challenges in civil rights and a path for the future of non-violence.

 

Friday, January 31, 12-1 p.m.
Lecture – “Afro-Descendants and Music: An Eternal Partnership” 
by DCC Assistant Professor of History Dr. Weldon McWilliams
Bowne Hall, Room 122
This lecture will look at the critical relationship that exists between music and Afro-descendants and whether music ever has served a purpose beyond regular enjoyment.

 

Friday, February 7, 12 p.m.
Lecture – “Pitch Dark Anarchy” by Dr. Randall Horton
Bowne Hall, Room 122
Dr. Horton will read from his latest poetry collection, “Pitch Dark Anarchy,” which is an extended meditation on the legacy of slavery, and the Amistad rebellion serves as a prefatory note, while the body of the text confronts contemporary issues of racial identity and urban decay. Through innovative formal and visual techniques, such as fractured syntax and typographical disruption, “Pitch Dark Anarchy” evokes the disorienting experiences of urban life, while also calling into question the complicity of language in the oppressive structures he anatomizes. Horton is an assistant professor of English at the University of New Haven and is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Bea Gonzalez Poetry Award and most recently a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Literature.

 

Saturday, February 8, 11 a.m.
Family Festival – “Anansi, Spiderman of Africa” by Crabgrass Puppet Theatre
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall
The show features a side-splitting selection of famous folktales from Africa starring Anansi the Spider, whose appetite always overrules his intellect. Anansi loves to eat and hates to work, so he tries to trick other animals out of their food.  But there’s no free lunch for Anansi, because all of his schemes leave him hungrier than ever!

 

Sunday, February 9, 3-5:30 p.m.
Annual Gospel Concert
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall
The show will feature soloists, praise dancers and youth and adult choirs from local churches. Following the concert, refreshments will be served in the Ritz Lounge. (Snow date: Feb. 16) For more information, contact Jackie Goffe-McNish at (845) 431-8445.

 

Tuesday, February 11, 12:30-1:50 p.m.
Poetry Jam Cafe
Ritz Lounge, Dutchess Hall
Students in DCC’s Rap Poetry Music club will perform original lyrics. 

 

Friday, February 14, 12-1 p.m.
Panel Discussion – Music of the Struggle
Room 122, Bowne Hall
Individuals on the panel will discuss the role of “black music” such as folk songs, work songs, religious songs and certain types of Pop music during the Civil Rights Movement. Professor Jackie Goffe-McNish will moderate the panel.

 

Thursday, February 20, 12:30 p.m.
Prose and Spirituals
Ritz Lounge, Dutchess Hall
The annual event is a celebration of music and poetry contributions inspired by the African American experience – both past and present.  The concert includes vocal music by the DCC choral ensembles, under the direction of Ann Foster. The poetry readings will be performed by students selected by Rose Wiley, English & Humanities instructor.

 

Saturday, February 22, 4-6 p.m.
An Evening of Cultural Dance Expressions: Then and Now
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall
The show will incorporate some of the earliest to the latest dance genres influencing those of African heritage living in America. African, Caribbean, Liturgical, Modern, Ballet, Tap, Hip-Hop, STEP and popular moves will create an exciting and electric dance concert. The evening will be filled with performances by dance troupes, teams and individuals moving to tunes representing dance through the decades. (Snow date: March 8) For more information, contact Gail Upchurch-Mills at (845) 431-8423.

 

Tuesday, February 25, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
African Market
Drumlin Hall
Vendors will offer hair products, jewelry, food and more. For additional information, contact Carmen McGill at (845) 431-8017. (Snow date:
April 8)


Thursday, February 27, 12:30 p.m.
Lyceum – “Reflections: The Life and Times of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” by Jim Lucas
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall
A student of the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jim Lucas chronicles the Civil Rights Movement through the eyes of Dr. King. He walks you through the twelve and a half years of Dr. King’s life as a civil rights leader. In this dramatic one man show, Lucas presents little-known facts about Dr. King and the movement as well as excerpts from some of his well-known speeches. 

 

Friday, February 28, 12-1 p.m.
Lecture – “From Nigger to Nigga: Progress?” 
by DCC English Instructor Jordan Elijah Bell
Bowne Hall, Room 104
The presentation will include several television and/or movie clips where people use both words. There will be an open forum discussion on what progress, if any, has been made in the nation’s transition from the word “Nigger” to the word “Nigga.”

  

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