DCC Events to Mark Black History Month

January 14, 2013 – A gospel concert, Kwanzaa celebration and a presentation by legendary comedian and activist Dick Gregory are just a few of the activities Dutchess Community College is offering to celebrate Black History Month. Activities will be held at DCC’s Poughkeepsie campus unless otherwise noted. All are free and open to the public.

DCC’s celebration of Kwanzaa will serve as the Black History Month kickoff event. It will be held on Jan. 29 at 12:30 p.m. in Dutchess Hall, room 101. The college community will celebrate the seven principles of Kwanzaa: Unity, Self Determination, Creative Work and Responsibility, Cooperative Economics, Purpose, Creativity and Faith.

A Lyceum presentation, “The World According to Dick Gregory: An Afternoon of Humor and Humanity,” will be held on Feb. 7 at 12:30 p.m. in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall as well as later in the evening at Marist College. Gregory’s social satire provided white Americans with a different perspective of black comedians. He also paired with other African American luminaries such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Medgar Evers for non-violent protests during the civil rights movement.

The gospel concert is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 3 p.m. in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall, and will feature praise dancers and youth and adult choirs from local churches. The show has drawn standing-room-only crowds for the past few years.

The Cultural Dance Expressions performance is another popular event, scheduled for Feb. 23,
4 to 6 p.m., in the James and Betty Hall Theatre in Dutchess Hall. The show will incorporate both classic and modern dance genres. Dance troupes, teams and individuals will perform African, Caribbean, Liturgical, Modern, Ballet, Tap, Hip Hop and other popular styles.

The full list of DCC Black History Month activities is below and on the events calendar at www.sunydutchess.edu.

For more information, contact co-chairpersons of the DCC Black History Month Committee, Carmen McGill at (845) 431-8017 or Yvonne Flowers at (845) 431-8074.

  

Tuesday, January 29, 12:30-2 p.m.
Kwanzaa Celebration (Kick-Off event)
Dutchess Hall, Room 101

The college community celebrates the seven principles of Kwanzaa: Unity, Self Determination, Creative Work and Responsibility, Cooperative Economics, Purpose, Creativity and Faith.

 

Thursday, January 31, 12:30 p.m.
Lyceum – “The African Burial Ground; A Lens on African Diasporan Cultures” by T. Rasul Murray
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

T. Rasul Murray, a poet, essayist and short story writer, is a native New Yorker who has lived in Brooklyn for more than 40 years. His work has appeared in African Voices, Black World and the Journal of Black Poetry. Murray is a licensed New York City Tour Guide who conducts private tours including a tour of Old Manhattan and its African past. He also serves as a volunteer historical interpreter and griot at the African Burial Ground National Monument.

 

Friday, February 1, 12-1 p.m.
Lecture – “The Reality of the Dream” by Dr. Weldon McWilliams
Room 122, Bowne Hall

This lecture will look at the radical change and shift in the philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., specifically post 1966.

 

Tuesday, February 5, 5 p.m.
Film – “Greencastle” Directed by, written by and starring Koran Dunbar
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

This feature-length drama explores issues of being a black, single father in rural America. The main character works as an assistant manager at a small town pet shop and is searching for meaning amidst the ache of despair.

 

Thursday, February 7, 12:30 p.m.
Lyceum – “The World According to Dick Gregory: An Afternoon of Humor and Humanity” by Dick Gregory
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

(The event will be held again at 7 p.m. that evening in the Marist College Hancock Center, Room 2023)

The social satire of legendary comedian Dick Gregory changed the way white America perceived African-American comedians. Gregory’s activism during the civil rights movement paired him with other African American luminaries such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Medgar Evers. He devoted much of his time to nonviolent protest with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and was jailed many times for his dedication to the cause. Gregory continues protesting for the greater good, including conducting fasts and protests for fishermen’s rights, ending hunger and ending the drug problem in the United States. His lasting legacy will be one of nonviolence and his belief in social responsibility for all citizens of the planet.

 

Friday, February 8, 12-1 p.m.
“Hurricane Damage – The Story of Muhammad Ali, Ron Lipton and Rubin ‘Hurricane’ Carter”
Room 122, Bowne Hall

Meet Ron Lipton, boxing referee and Muhammad Ali’s lifelong friend and former sparring partner, at this presentation complete with films and photographs that tell the story of a lifelong battle of hope, loyalty, sacrifice and redemption. Lipton, a Marist College boxing instructor and winner of a lifetime civil rights achievement award, also was the police detective who convinced Muhammad Ali to help him free famous boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter from prison due to an unjust conviction.

 

Saturday, February 9, 11 a.m.
Family Festival – Evelyn Clarke
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

Professional storyteller Evelyn Clarke will use her vivid, vibrant and versatile voice to entertain children of all ages by giving each character their own voice in her collection of African and Caribbean folktales.

 

Sunday, February 10, 3-5:30 p.m.
Annual Gospel Concert
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

The show will feature soloists, praise dancers and youth and adult choirs from local churches. Following the concert, refreshments will be served in the Ritz Lounge.

(Snow date: Feb. 17) For more information, contact Deborah Porter at (845) 431-8049.

 

February 11 – March 8
Art Gallery Exhibit – Sadee Brathwaite, “Cosmic Daughters and Sacred Grandmothers”

Brathwaite’s oil-on-canvas pieces feature figures designed to connect to the universal female, while some paintings focus on elder women that are mentors and educators. An artist’s reception will be held on Feb. 13 at 5 p.m. in the gallery.

 

Tuesday, February 12, 12:30-1:50 p.m.
Poetry Jam Cafe
Ritz Lounge

Students in DCC’s Rap Poetry Music club will perform original lyrics.

 

Friday, February 15, 12-1 p.m.
Panel Discussion – The Great Northern Movement
Room 122, Bowne Hall

The panel will consist of individuals who traveled from the great agrarian South to the industrial North. Scheduled guests are Annie Abram, BS & MS Alcorn State University and advisory engineer at IBM for 25 years; Aubrey Dennis, BS in Math and MS in industrial management, retired IBM Manager and Frank Reid, retired engineer. DCC English Professor Jackie Goffe-McNish will moderate the panel.

 

Thursday, February 21, 12:30 p.m.
Prose and Spirituals
Ritz Lounge

The annual event is a celebration of music and poetry contributions inspired by the African American experience – both past and present. The concert includes vocal music by the DCC choral ensembles, under the direction of Elizabeth Gerbi. The poetry readings will be performed by students of Mrs. Rose Wiley, English & Humanities instructor.

 

Friday, February 22, 12-1 p.m.
Lecture – “Black is Beautiful, Hip-Hop and the Age of Barack Obama” by Dr. Weldon McWilliams
Room 122, Bowne Hall

Dr. McWilliams will explore the commonalities within these three phenomena and discuss the relationship between these movements in African American history. He will show how they are interconnected and interdependent upon each other.

 

Saturday, February 23, 4-6 p.m.
An Evening of Cultural Dance Expressions: Then and Now
James and Betty Hall Theatre, Dutchess Hall

The show will incorporate some of the earliest to the latest dance genres influencing those of African heritage living in America. African, Caribbean, Liturgical, Modern, Ballet, Tap, Hip-Hop, STEP and popular moves will create an exciting and electric dance concert. The evening will be filled with performances by dance troupes, teams and individuals moving to tunes representing dance through the decades.

(Snow date: March 9) For more information, contact Deborah Porter at (845) 431-8049.

 

Thursday, March 28, 5:30 p.m.
Lecture – “The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime and the Making of Modern Urban America” by Dr. Khalil Gilbran Muhammad
Vassar College

Dr. Khalil Gilbran Muhammad, director of The Schomburg Center, will be the guest speaker at Vassar College to celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and discuss his book, “The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime and the Making of Modern Urban America.”

 

Tuesday, April 9, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
African Market
Drumlin Hall

Vendors will offer hair products, jewelry, food and more.

  

###